Here’s How To Make Your SaaS Marketing Strategy Generate Revenue

Optimizing for conversions is just the tip of the iceberg. November 13, 2019 4 min read Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. Entrepreneurs who venture into the SaaS industry are often fueled by the passion of building phenomenal products that can change their customers’s lives, but also consider marketing and sales central to realizing their…

Optimizing for conversions is just the tip of the iceberg.


4 min read

Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own.

Entrepreneurs who venture into the SaaS industry are often fueled by the passion of building phenomenal products that can change their customers’s lives, but also consider marketing and sales central to realizing their goals. Marketing for a SaaS business is uniquely challenging. Unlike traditional product- or service-based businesses, the element of tangibility is low.

While there are many so-called hacks to follow when strategizing, there is only one approach that can yield consistent revenue regularly. It involves successfully leveraging content to your advantage. Here’s how.

1. Optimize your website for conversions.

Content optimization and keyword research are central to ensuring that your SaaS site comes up when customers search for a product that you offer. How do you go about doing it? Identify all the buy-intent keywords that your potential customers may be searching for and optimize your existing landing pages to target them. The idea is to direct potential customers to your website whenever they’re making a purchasing decision. 

You should be focusing on drawing traffic that has the potential to convert, impact the business’s bottom line and deliver promising ROI. This is exactly what’s promised by the hockey-stick content-growth strategy, which focuses on generating leads with content.

Related: Buying or Selling an SaaS Company? Read This First.

2. Create content that meets your target audience’s queries.

To drive organic traffic to the landing pages, it needs to be layered with content pieces. Focus on answering queries that cover what customers in the consideration phase of marketing funnel would ideally be looking for by targeting middle-of-the funnel keywords. This ensures that the leads entering your funnel will be higher along in their journey of discovery and more likely to convert. These content pieces also act as a bridge when building backlinks to your landing pages, driving link equity as well as referral traffic back to the conversion-optimized pages on your blog.

3.  Make sure your content comes up in relevant searches.

In a perfect world, you would only need to produce stellar content and your audience would automatically discover it, publications would organically link to it and you would get a string of leads flowing in right away. The truth is, no matter how well-researched your content is, it seldom reaches its audience unless you put forth some serious effort. How do you do that? Build backlinks for your content. Pitch to high-authority industry publications within your niche that target the same audience as you and offer to write guest articles for them. This builds the authority for your SaaS website, getting your content to rank organically while driving referral traffic at the same time. 

Related: 4 Ways SaaS Can Make Entrepreneurs More Efficient 

Now that you have attracted leads, nurtured them with information and gotten them to convert into paying customers, what next?

  • Optimize your content for the entire sales cycle. The retention stage of theSaaS sales cycle is often of crucial importance, because the SaaS model relies heavily on ongoing subscriptions rather than one-time purchases. Having an ongoing relationship with the customer is crucial for their engagement and retention. The value of content isn’t limited to the inbound traffic. It can be used as a tool for training the existing users and offering them added value to retain them as well. 

  • Leverage content as a remarketing tool. Content can be used to connect with the leads stored in your SaaS CRM software and re-engage with them. The SaaS industry is highly dynamic and rapidly evolving, and SaaS entrepreneurs need to stay abreast of all changes by constantly upgrading their products. Content opens up new avenues for upselling and cross-selling in Saas. 

  • Monitor the customer actions. While content is certainly crucial to getting qualified leads into your sales funnel, getting them to eventually convert requires insights into analytics and expertise in user experience. Monitor what actions your users are performing on your website to figure out what is working and what isn’t.

SaaS is an industry where everything — the product, its marketing, sales interactions and customer support — is tightly bound. Every touchpoint of customer interaction needs to provide a seamless experience to the users to unlock revenue potential and ensure long-term growth. Marketing is no exception.

Where Live Video Fits into Your Marketing Strategy

Live video is a hugely powerful marketing tool. It combines visual imagery with a unique form of urgency, two-way communication, and an appearance on popular social media channels. But like any marketing tool, it shouldn’t stand alone. Live video has to be worked into an overall marketing strategy in which different elements support and reinforce…

Live video is a hugely powerful marketing tool. It combines visual imagery with a unique form of urgency, two-way communication, and an appearance on popular social media channels. But like any marketing tool, it shouldn’t stand alone. Live video has to be worked into an overall marketing strategy in which different elements support and reinforce each other to build trust and desire, and guide leads to the purchase.

Using live video for your marketing at your launch is crucial.

Brands that release their products with spectacular, eye-catching shows have long used live broadcasts to attract as large an audience as possible. Apple’s product launches fill the company’s own auditorium with journalists but also go out to people watching at home at the same time. When designers like Michael Kors release their new collections, they offer live video feeds from the catwalk.

Smaller brands might have less splashy launches but they can still use live video.

The live video will also support the products immediately afterward. Once the product is out and available, hold an AMA or a live product demonstration. You will already have trailed the launch and generated interest. The live video that follows the launch will give you an opportunity to show the product’s benefits and value instead of only describing them.

Later, you can follow up that product demo with more broadcasts that help customers make the most of the product. Beauty firms like Schwarzkopf, for example, have built large audiences with live tutorials.

One powerful marketing strategy is for a brand to associate itself with a campaign for a good cause.

Starbucks, for example, has long taken part in voter registration drives. That association helps to raise the company’s profile and enables it to support a cause that all its customers, however they vote, should be able to support. When the coffee chain takes part in registration drives or helps to organize events to encourage voter registration, it often broadcasts them live. Viewers get to see a street party—often with celebrities—and they see the company’s logo.

Much of today’s marketing strategy is content marketing.

Businesses issue a steady stream of information to customers that help them to remain informed and educated about a topic they find interesting. Customers get to satisfy their curiosity, and the brand gets to show off its expertise, build trust, and create a connection with its audience.

That content comes in a number of different forms. It might take the form of articles, both original and shared. It could take the form of images or the release of data that reveal trends and the results of experiments. But it can also take the form of interviews with other experts.

A surf shop, for example, might interview a surfer about how they use their boards and find great waves. Those interviews could be published as text on the surf shop’s blog. They could be uploaded as video that’s cut and edited to include the best content and make both the shop and the surfer look their best.

But it could also take the form of a live video. That allows audience members to participate. They could use the comment form to ask questions, like a radio phone-in. The interviewee wouldn’t even need to travel to the company itself.

Businesses like BeLive.tv provide third-party plugins that create split-screen interviews, like in news broadcasts. The interviewer could sit in the office while the interviewee remains at home and talks through their webcam or their phone. It’s a very easy way to add interactive, visual content to a content marketing strategy.

Live video is the only marketing tool that combines immediacy, visual imagery, and interaction. Work it into your marketing strategy and you’ll give your sales efforts a powerful boost.

image credit: ySxubvil

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Joel Comm

The Functional Futurist

Joel Comm is New York Times bestselling author, blockchain enthusiast, podcast host, professional keynote speaker, social media marketing strategist, live video expert, technologist, brand influencer, futurist and eternal 12-year old. With over two decades of experience harnessing the power of the web, publishing, social media and mobile applications to expand reach and engage in active relationship marketing, Joel is a sought-after public speaker who leaves his audiences inspired, entertained, and armed with strategic tools to create highly effective new media campaigns. His latest project is as co-host of The Bad Crypto Podcast, a top cryptocurrency show making the future of digital payments easy to understand.